Pages created and updated by Terry Sturtevant Date Posted: January 16, 2017


Introduction to Breadboards

Here is a view of a simple breadboard.


simple breadboard

[click image to get a larger image]

Here's a view of the back with the paper cover removed.


back of breadboard

[click image to get a larger image]

You can see how the holes on the top are connected underneath; each row of 5 across on one side of the trough is connected, but the rows down each side are connected all the way. These side rows cab be called "busses".
Here's another breadboard, with more busses. Notice there are two rows on each side.


four bus breadboard

[click image to get a larger image]

Here's another.


another four bus breadboard

[click image to get a larger image]

And here's the back with the paper cover removed.


back of four bus breadboard

[click image to get a larger image]

Notice one big change from the first breadboard; the side busses are each only connected halfway down the board. They stop at the middle, so that the top and bottom aren't connected to each other.
This means that, if you want, you can actually think of this board as having eight busses, rather than four.

Wiring with Breadboards

Here is one chip on a breadboard:


chip on breadboard

[click image to get a larger image]

For many chips, the GROUND pin is on the lower left and POWER is on the upper right, so using the left bus for ground and the right for power makes a lot of sense.

Here are two chips on a breadboard. Note how the use of the "busses" along the side make wiring easier, especially when using multiple chips.


two chips on a breadboard

[click image to get a larger image]

By cutting wires to a reasonable length, the circuit can be made tidier and easier to debug. (This figure also shows how clip leads are attached; they're connected to the busses, not to individual chips.)


neat wiring

[click image to get a larger image]

Connecting the board to the bench supply can be done like this (Note how I have consistently used only red wires for power and black wires for ground.):


connecting breadboard to bench power

[click image to get a larger image]

Here's a close-up of one way to connect the alligator clips to the bench supply:


connecting clips to bench power

[click image to get a larger image]


This way is better; note the clips are very firmly attached and can't short out to one another.


connecting clips to bench power

[click image to get a larger image]

Here's how to combine multiple boards, including debugger boards.
Note that doing it this way means that each clip lead only clips to a single wire.


daisy-chaining boards

[click image to get a larger image]



Resources

To view pdf documents, you can download Adobe Acrobat Reader .
get Acrobat Reader
If you need to update a browser, you might try Firefox which is Get Firefox!
Since this page uses cascading style sheets for its layout, it will look best with a browser which supports the specifications as fully as possible.

If you are looking for an office package, with a word processor, spreadsheet, etc., you might try LibreOffice which is Get LibreOffice!

Go to the main page for the Department of Physics and Computer Science.

Valid XHTML 1.1

Valid CSS!

WCAG
2.0
(Level AA)

Wilfrid Laurier University